Mission Directory

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Welcome to the Missions Page.

Here you can find information on the basic nature of missions, and find some example missions that you can adapt to your game. Feel free to add your mission to the directory, and be sure to check out each category for some interesting ideas.

Contents

Mission Categories

Typically, any given mission will fall into one of the following categories: Point Defense, Item Retrieval, Puzzle, Escort, or Assassination. Each category represents a distinct "flavor" for the game, as they each create different combat scenarios and strategies that are not likely to show up in another category. Some missions may also include elements from more than one category, allowing for an even greater variety of "flavors." Each style of mission is described in more detail below.

Point Defense

Point defense missions usually consist of defending an area, object, or person for a predetermined amount of time. In these missions, Humans are given an amount of time to organize themselves while being briefed on the mission objectives. The humans may decide to form replica watches or some other form of defense. It's always helpful to be resourceful and to use whatever the situation provides, whether it's trees, chest-high walls, or other people. It's also always important to make sure that the Human Objective is well-guarded. It only takes one zombie to fail the mission for the humans. At times, there may be more than one objective for the Humans to guard. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. Not only are the humans split into two or more groups, but so are the zombies. Depending on what blasters the humans are carrying into battle, the battlefield commanders (Which in some cases, are Administrators playing the role of battlefield commander) may decide to split the groups based on available firepower. This can be a double-edged sword. The firepower is somewhat equal between the divided human groups, but the experience levels can differ greatly, and some groups may or may not be having to deal off the same amount of zombies. These missions can prove to be the most difficult, especially if the zombies are fighting a battle with a tactic known as attrition, which can wear down the humans and force them to run out of ammunition (darts) quickly.

Although it is possible to have a Zombie Point Defense mission, they are very hard to balance correctly. The massive range advantage Humans have allows them to push Zombies from a defensive point quite easily. If considering a Zombie Point Defense mission, remember to pick an area that heavily favors Zombies in terms of geography and playstyle. Large quantities of heavy cover and plentiful ambush points in and around the area are two factors, but are certianly not the only ones.

(This section is kinda not done, and I'm gonna finish it, but if anyone wants to add anything, go right ahead :P)

Item Retrieval

In Item Retrieval, Humans will try to take one or more object(s) and bring it back to a territory. This is popular as it gives humans incentive to charge etc... Sometimes moderators or players will go the extra mile and build a elaborate object or it could just be a textbook, softball etc...

There have also been Zombie Item Retrieval missions, either to distract the horde during a human mission or arrange for the two opposing forces to meet. Also, focusing a mission solely on a Zombie Item Retrieval and simpy informing the humans "The Zombies are doing something, go figure it out and stop it" Can offer a refreshing change from the otherwise Human-centric mission planning that characterizes most HvZ games.

Puzzle

Humans or Zombies must complete a puzzle or series of puzzles in order to complete the mission. These span from simple individual puzzles to large scale puzzles with multiple variables being important.

Small Scale: Complete half constructed lego set while fellow players defend area

Large Scale: Humans must have 3 of 5 nodes activated to unlock the final area. If at any point Humans occupy less than 3 nodes, final puzzle resets. Final puzzle requires players to solve 3 rubix cubes in order for mission to be a success.

Escort

Humans or Zombies must escort important person or object from a starting point to a finish point. Very similar to Item Retrieval, but with an emphasis on slowing down the protection group and encouraging conflict.

Assassination

Humans must find and eliminate (stun) a key figure pertaining to the mission. Could be a human or a zombie, and either a player or an NPC.

Zombie mission in which the Zombies must eliminate (stun) a key member of the Human resistance, or even a Zombie traitor.

Missions are characterised by ad-hoc battles fought by smaller groups that accidentally encounter each other, rather than the large battle lines in Point Defence. Reconisance is extremly important in these missions for both sides in order to locate the target individual and formulate the best method of attack.

Combining Mission Types

Some of the best missions are combinations of different aspects of the vanilla mission types listed above. Incorporating a point defence around a group trying to complete a puzzle is the classic example but there are many others. Also putting different mission types in a sequence works well. Requiring players to complete an Item Retrieval, and then making them escort all those items in one final move to a safe zone is another good example.


The Directory

While it is usually better in the long run to come up with your own ideas in order to maintain a certain uniqueness for your game, sometimes it's not a bad idea to take a look at some cool ideas other games have created, or to find a relatively simple mission idea that may just turn out to be more fun than a bigger, more complicated mission. Both of those things can be found here. Any mission included in this directory should be tagged as one of the five types, and placed in the matching section. Any mission with more than one tag (Advanced Missions) should have one tag be a primary tag (the core element of that mission), and the other tag(s) as secondary tags--for example, a mission to escort a scientist to some location and defend him for a certain time would have Escort as the primary tag and Point Defense as the secondary tag. This system should make it fairly easy for everyone to find the exact kind of mission they're looking for.

Simple Missions

Simple missions only fall into one of the five categories, and as such should be fairly straightforward when it comes to running the mission and briefing the players. These missions are useful if your game is new or fairly small-scale, or if you just need a simple idea to fall back on for whatever reason. In any case, simply click on one of the five categories to explore missions of that type.

Point Defense

Item Retrieval

Puzzle

Escort

Assassination


Advanced Missions

The Advanced Missions combine multiple mission types in order to create a more complicated mission, and thus (hopefully) and more interesting experience for everyone playing. Naturally, these missions will involve a bit more hassle to run, and you should probably expect more questions at the briefing. If that doesn't scare you away from the idea, you can use these missions to greatly enrich your game. To begin, select a primary tag below.

Point Defense

Item Retrieval

Puzzle

Escort

Assassination

Also, note that swapping the primary and secondary tags DOES count as a separate type of combined mission. In the case of the previously mentioned "Escort then Defend the Scientist" example, the reverse of this would be defending a point (perhaps a drop zone where the scientist can arrive), then escorting the scientist to a safe location. Obviously, this is a much different mission, so be careful about this when sorting missions. However, if you do run into a mission that gives equal weight to both parts (such as an Escort/Item Retrieval mission where an NPC is escorted during the search for the item), place it in both sections so that it isn't missed by someone who only happens to check one of the sections.

Finally, for the sake of simplicity, this directory will not go beyond two tags (for now), as it is best used as a starting point or a grab bag for those who just need some fairly simple missions. If you do have some kind of (working) grand mission that encompasses more than two or three categories, contact an admin, and we'll see about fitting it in somewhere. Otherwise, just stick to the simple stuff for this directory.

Additional Resources

  • HvZ and the Art of Game Design, by Alex Clippinger. Contains an extensive reference on types of existing mechanics and advanced considerations when creating missions. [1]
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